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Programming Archive

Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 7:00pm

Join host Nick Noble on this week's edition of The Folk Revival for four hours of music from some of the finest female artists in folk music, past and present: Barbara Dane, Odetta, Ronnie Gilbert, Judy Collins, Sylvia Fricker Tyson, Carolyn Hester, Jean Ritchie, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Mary Travers, Beth DeSombre, the Nields, the Johnson Girls, and MANY MORE, including, of course, The Womenfolk.

Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 6:00pm


In this ethereal and lovely mélange of sound you will hear harp and voice, bass, flute, saxophone, clarinet and recorder. It’s an airy synergy of Jazz harmonies with modern pop music. Featuring Allegra Cramer on Harp and Voice, Sagit Zilberman on Flute, Suji Kim on Bass

Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 10:00am

Why does a grouse bury itself in snow? Do jays really talk to themselves? Inquiry welcomes back acclaimed scientist, author and natural historian BERND HEINRICH. Tonight he talks about his new book ONE WILD BIRD AT A TIME: PORTRAITS OF INDIVIDUAL LIVES. In each of the essays in this book, Bernd Heinrich uses his scientific knowledge and field skills to attempt to unravel the reasons behind the behavior of common species of woodland birds like Ruffed Grouse, Blue Jay and Black-capped Chickadee. This is a wonderful book about how to look at the natural world like a scientist. (photo by Sheila Carroll)

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 3:00pm

Woodpeckers fascinate everybody. But how do they avoid getting concussions when they drum on trees? Do sapsuckers really sick sap? How can we change forestry practices to help conserve woodpeckers? What is that woodpecker that is drumming on your gutter doing? We will discover the answers to these questions and many more when we talk with conservationist and author STEPHEN A. SHUNK about his new book,  the PETERSON REFERENCE GUIDE TO WOODPECKERS OF NORTH AMERICA. (photograph of Yellow-bellied Sapsucker by Sheila Carroll)

Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - 6:00pm

Singer and Broadway performer Jessica Molaskey talks about her work with husband John Pizzarelli and her CD tribute to Peggy Lee. You can also catch Jessica every Saturday and Sunday on her show Radio Deluxe, hosted with her husband John Pizzarelli!

Monday, April 25, 2016 - 7:00pm

Join host Tom Shaker this week as we celebrate and remember the legacy of a true American musical genius, Prince. 

Monday, April 25, 2016 - 6:00pm

 In the late 1930s, a bespectacled white man who played the clarinet was a teen idol. That was Benny Goodman, and he got to be that way from leading a quartet with Lionel Hampton, Teddy Wilson and Gene Krupa — one of jazz's first racially integrated bands. In a special stage show written by Geoffrey Ward and narrated by Wendell Pierce, a young band (Christian Sands, piano; Joel Ross, vibraphone; Sammy Miller, drums) with a rotating cast of clarinetists (Will Anderson, Peter Anderson, Patrick Bartley and Janelle Reichman) tells the whole story at Jazz at Lincoln Center.

Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 10:30pm

On May 19, 1942, a U-boat in the Gulf of Mexico stalked its prey fifty miles from New Orleans. Captained by twenty nine-year-old Iron Cross and King's Cross recipient Erich Wurdemann, the submarine set its sights on the freighter Heredia with sixty-two souls on board.

Most aboard were merchant seamen, but there were also a handful of civilians, including the Downs family: Ray and Ina, and their two children, eight-year-old Sonny and eleven-year-old Lucille. Fast asleep in their berths, the Downs family had no idea that two torpedoes were heading their way. When the ship exploded, chaos ensued ― and each family member had to find their own path to survival.

Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 when Al is joined by Alison O'Leary author of "So Close To Home" and hear how this remarkable family struggled to safety.

Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 10:00pm

In an all-new The Business Beat, Steve Jones-D’Agostino of Susan Wagner PR+Best Rate of Climb interviews Joe Bush, executive director of Worcester CleanTech Incubator. They talk about fostering the growth of new “green” enterprises.

Joe is a scientist, manager, and entrepreneur who is passionate about leveraging technology to improve our standard of living, while bringing our ecological impact in-line with regional and global carrying capacities.

Worcester CleanTech Incubator’s mission is to foster the growth of new enterprises to address the most pressing issues of our time. The Incubator states its belief that “entrepreneurship is the lifeblood of innovation and the key to society’s transition towards sustainability.” The Incubator provides both the physical and network resources companies need to propel their ideas to market.

Founded and operated by the Institute for Energy and Sustainability, the Incubator is a community in the heart of Central Massachusetts dedicated to building change.  The Incubator facility, located in the Printers Building – here  at 44 Portland Street in downtown Worcester - provides more than 10,000 square feet of space that offers private offices, co-working space, conference rooms, event space, and prototyping labs.  

Joe Bush expresses his eagerness to help fellow entrepreneurs as well as established businesses grow the regional green economy.

Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 9:00pm

Black and white cinematography is virtually a lost art form. At their best, black and white films were a “transformative art” and “a meditation on reality”. Black and white films have a unique beauty, and aesthetic all their own. You cannot imagine films like Citizen Kane or Psycho in anything but black and white. Tune in tonight when we welcome back WHEELER WINSTON DIXON, the James Ryan Professor of Film Studies, the coordinator of the film studies program and a professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Tonight we talk about his wonderful new history: BLACK AND WHITE CINEMA: A SHORT HISTORY.

Alexander von Humboldt was a driven European scientist who traveled throughout South America and Russia and changed the way we think about the natural world. He invented isobars and the concept of “the web of life”. He was a friend of people like Goethe, Simón Bolívar and Thomas Jefferson and his writings influenced  Darwin, Thoreau and John Muir. Yet his name is almost unknown in America. Tonight on Inquiry we talk with writer and historian ANDREA WULF about her wonderful new book THE INVENTION OF NATURE: ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT’S NEW WORLD. 

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