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Programming Archive

Friday, June 29, 2012 - 2:00pm

This Friday during the 3PM hour of Jazz Matinee, host Ed Gardella will be joined by drummer Mark Holovnia.  Holovnia is an accomplished drummer and teacher who has toured with both the Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw bands.  He will be making music selections to share with the WICN listeners.

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 7:00pm

Host Nick Noble plays listener requests and fan favorites, featuring special guests: singer/songwriters Laura Siersema and Erin Thomas - and more!

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 6:00pm

With three Grammys to her credit, Lari White's multi-faceted career as an award-winning recording artist, hit songwriter, producer, independent record label owner, and versatile actress has earned her the title of Nashville's "Renaissance Woman." As the first female producer of a male superstar, Lari recently made music history by producing Toby Keith's platinum album White Trash with Money. Her songwriting credits include Tammy Wynette, Lonestar, Toby Keith, and Sarah Buxton, and Danny Gokey. She had a part in the blockbuster movie Cast Away, and has made her critically-acclaimed Broadway debut in "Ring of Fire.” This "Renaissance Woman" joins host Feinstein to share her musical journey on this edition of Song Travels.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 10:00am

Tonight’s guest is writer and editor JOY M. KISER. When she was an Assistant Librarian at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Ms Kiser saw on display a truly beautiful book from the late nineteenth Century illustrating birds nests. Created  by one Genevieve Estelle Jones it was titled Illustrations of the Nests and Eggs of Birds of Ohio. Kiser discovered that this was virtually a lost book. Although the lithographs rivaled those of Audubon, few people knew of the books existence. As Kiser researched the history of the book and of the Jones family, she uncovered an incredible story of determination, passion,  tragedy and family love.  Tune in tonight for a remarkable story of unique woman of the late 1800s and her formerly lost  book that has now been published so we can all enjoy Jones’s work. Kiser’s book which includes full color reproductions of all of the plates of Illustrations of the Nests and Eggs of Ohio is titled AMERICA’S  OTHER AUDUBON. 

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - 6:00pm

Singer/pianist Geoffrey Tozer talks about his kooky, fun-loving radio show “The Sly Crooner of Swanktown” and shares his thoughts on getting more swank in the world.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - 11:00am

The passage of the planet Venus across the face of the Sun as seen from Earth is called “the Transit of Venus”. It is the rarest eclipse in our solar system and occurs typically only twice every century. In the Eighteenth Century, it was of critical importance to observe and carefully measure the Transit of Venus because it would allow a more precise measurement the distances of the planets from the sun.  More importantly, these numbers could be used in calculating nautical longitude. The country that could best measure longitude ruled the seas. Tune in tonight when we talk with journalist and author MARK ANDERSON about his latest book that follows several Venus transit expeditions to the ends of the earth in 1761 and 1769. These scientist adventurers braved wars, disease, hostile locals, and horrible weather all to observe a distant planet pass in front of the sun. Anderson’s amazing book is titled THE DAY THE WORLD DISCOVERED THE SUN: AN EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF SCIENTIFIC ADVENTURE AND THE RACE TO TRACK THE TRANSIT OF VENUS

Monday, June 25, 2012 - 7:00pm

Soul singer/songwriter Eddie Floyd scored one of the defining hits of the Memphis soul sound with "Knock on Wood," a number one R&B smash that typified the Stax Records style at its grittiest. Join host Tom Shaker as he celebrates Eddie's 75th birthday this Monday starting at 7pm!

Monday, June 25, 2012 - 6:00pm

At first blush, this Jamaican pianist seems an unlikely leader to honor a "king" and a "chairman of the board." But Monty Alexander discovered jazz at a Nat King Cole concert and played his first New York gig at Sinatra's old haunt called 'Jilly's'. Alexander offers fresh, inventive readings on "Sweet Lorraine," "Come Fly with Me" and more -- with vocalists James DeFrances and Allan Harris. Wendell Pierce hosts.

Sunday, June 24, 2012 - 10:30pm

For 21 years retired U.S. Army Colonel Douglas Lising took orders from the United States government. But, he signed up for that. What he didn't sign up for was a Federal Government that constantly oversteps it's bounds to interfere in state sovereignty and individual freedoms. Tune in this Sunday evening when Al is joined by Doug Lising to talk about his new book, "Remember Roscoe Filburn" the true story of how one man's freedoms were completely stripped away.

Sunday, June 24, 2012 - 9:00pm

In the 1890s New York City was truly a “Sin City”. Illegal gambling was rampant. Countless bars and taverns guaranteed spectacular alcohol consumption even on Sundays when the bars were supposed to be closed. It was estimated that there were minimally 30, 000 prostitutes active in the metropolis at the time, and shocking live sex shows could be found any night in certain sections of the city. So where were the city’s police force? The police were part of the city’s Tammany Hall political machine and were astonishingly corrupt and on the take. Then came the infamous muckracking Lexow Committee and an election that swept many of the corrupt politicians out. Future President and anti-vice crusader Teddy Roosevelt was brought on as Police Commissioner. But were the rank and file New Yorkers ready to give up their vices like drinking on Sunday? Tune in tonight when Inquiry talks to writer RICHARD ZACKS about his rollicking history ISLAND OF VICE: THEODORE ROOSEVELT’S DOOMED QUEST TO CLEAN UP SIN LOVING NEW YORK.

In the mid 1800s, a number of Americans formed unique communes to live separate form the rest of society and aspire to a more spiritual life. None of these experiments in living were as unique or as destined for failure as the Fruitlands in Harvard, Massachusetts. Founded by Bronson Alcott, father of Louisa May, the Fruitlanders had very strict beliefs about diet, sex and what you could wear. But their tight little group nestled in the hinterlands could not avoid internal turmoil and conflict that would eventually tear their idyllic group life apart. This is a gripping story of lofty spiritual ideals chaffing against earth bound human emotions. Tonight on Inquiry, we speak with RICHARD FRANCIS, Research Fellow at Harvard, he has taught American Studies on both sides of the Atlantic. His fascinating new history is titled FRUITLANDS: THE ALCOTT FAMILY AND THEIR SEARCH FOR UTOPIA.

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