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Programming Archive

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 10:30pm

Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my. No its not Dorothy or the Wizard of OZ. This week Al is joined by Bob Derr, Editorial Director of TIME for Kids a subsidiary of TIME magazine. They recently published a new childrens book entitled, ZOO-3D. This book is filled with 3D pictures of  over a hundred full page pictures and stories of wild animals. Just when you think tehnology has replaced traditional reading TIME has answered the call with an engaging and educational book that has young people reading and learning about the animal kingdom. Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 and hear Bobs Derr's approach to getting children both young and old to read.

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 10:00pm

In an encore episode, Steve interviews Ken Stafford, director of of WPI's Robotics Resource Center and associate director of WPI's Robotics Engineering Program.  They talk about the present and future of robotics in business and society.

Whether the goal is to relieve human workers of exhausting and repetitive tasks, increase productivity and efficiency, or take people out of harm’s way, robotics plays an integral role in all aspects of manufacturing, medicine, and more. And it will take on even greater importance in the future.

In fact, the demand for qualified robotics engineers is poised to grow by as much as 13 percent through 2018, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

WPI is the first university in the nation to offer a bachelor's degree program in Robotics Engineering--- and first to offer MS and PhD degrees. As a result, WPI is committed to providing hands-on, practical education to tomorrow’s robotics engineers.

Ken came to WPI in 1994 as the department head of Aerospace Studies. Shortly after his retirement as a U.S. Air Force colonel in 1997, he was hired to manage several WPI student-design competition teams. One of them was the WPI/Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science FIRST robotics team. This team has since grown to become one of the most popular student activities at WPI and has received more than 60 local, regional, and international awards and trophies -- including the 2007 World Championship.

Ken was also a member of the WPI interdisciplinary team that developed the school’s Robotics Engineering curriculum and established its bachelor’s, master’s, and PhD degree programs in robotics engineering. He is shown, far right, posing with WPI's Robotics Team.

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 9:00pm

In 1835, the capital of the United States was known as Washington City. The President at that time was Andrew Jackson, who was pro-slavery. But at least 4,000 inhabitants of the city were former slaves called “free men”. Racial tensions and relations in the Washington City reflected the conflicted feelings of the country as a whole. There were many white people who still believed in slavery of course; however, there were others who thought we should end slavery but send the Black Americans back to Africa. True Abolitionists were gaining ground, yet their ideas and literature were considered subversive in Washington. The Red and Blue dynamics we see in the political landscape today was started at this time. Key players included Francis Scott Key, who penned The Star Spangles Banner, but who had a later political career in which he became a champion of slavery. Tune in tonight when we talk about this complicated story of race, politics and little known American history with reporter, correspondent and writer Jefferson Morley. Morley’s new must-read history is titled "Snow Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835.

Horror films have been made since the beginning of cinema. Thomas Edison made one of the earliest film treatments of the Frankenstein novel. Since those early days, horror films have had a long, complex multinational history. Tonight’s guest on Inquiry is Dr. Wheeler Winston Dixon the James Ryan Endowed Professor of Film Studies and professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. His latest book on film history is one of the most complete and far ranging histories of this genre: "A History of Horror." Tonight we discuss the beginnings of the horror film and concentrate on the fascinating story of the British film company Hammer Films, which in the 1960s reinvigorated the cinema of horror with classic films like The Curse of Frankenstein and Dracula, Prince of Darkness and made international stars of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. If you are passionate about horror films, don’t miss tonight’s show!

Saturday, October 27, 2012 - 4:00pm

Jazz vocalist Rebecca Parris has a distinguished voice that is well-known in the jazz world and throughout New England. Raised in the Newton, Massachusetts, the jazz improviser and teacher has released nearly a dozen albums to date.

Ms. Parris will join Brazilian born, New York City-based drummer/composer Mauricio Zottarelli and his quintet MOZIK for a celebration of the music of Jobim on Tuesday, October 30th at Scullers Jazz Club in Boston.

Catch Colors of Jazz when host Bonnie Johnson speaks with Rebecca Parris about this special appearance and her latest musical endeavors. Be sure to tune in at 4pm this Saturday!

Saturday, October 27, 2012 - 4:00pm

Jazz vocalist Rebecca Parris has a distinguished voice that is well-known in the jazz world and throughout New England.  Raised in the Newton, Massachusetts, the jazz improviser and teacher has released nearly a dozen albums to date. Ms. Parris will join Brazilian born, New York City-based drummer/composer Mauricio Zottarelli and his quintet MOZIK for a celebration of the music of Jobim on Tuesday, October 30th at Scullers Jazz Club in Boston.

Catch Colors of Jazz when host Bonnie Johnson speaks with Rebecca Parris about this special appearance and her latest musical endeavors. Be sure to tune in at 4pm this Saturday!

Thursday, October 25, 2012 - 7:00pm

Host Nick Noble wraps up his birthday month with four hours of his favorite songs, including tracks from Schooner Fare, Peter-Paul-&-Mary, the Highwaymen, Beth DeSombre, the Cumberland Trio, the Limeliters, Doug Kwartler, Joan Baez, and many more! No pitches, no interviews, just four hours of music.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 6:00pm

Raised in England and Pakistan, Sarah Joyce (widely recognized by her stage name, Rumer) possesses a deep connection to the heyday of the early-'70s singer-songwriter era, along with shades of Broadway, '30s jazz and gospel. After years of effort, Rumer is beginning to reap the rewards: Her debut album, Seasons of My Soul, reached No. 3 on the U.K. charts and was certified platinum.

Here, Rumer joins host Michael Feinstein to talk about Judy Garland, Burt Bacharach and old Hollywood, all of which inspire her to perform a few tunes from the Great American Songbook, as well as a few of her own songs.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 6:00pm

Jazz vocal great, Mark Murphy discusses his inspirations and the advice he give to young singers: listen to drummers to improve scat singing.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 12:00pm

Could medical cannabis be the next big cash crop for America? What is the real cost of America’s on-going drug war? Tune in tonight when we talk with writer and reporter DOUG FINE who spent a year with the hard-working cannabis farmers of Mendocino County, California where under strict control people are legally growing marijuana for medicinal use despite constant harassment by the Federal government. This question about the decriminalization of marijuana is on the Massachusetts State ballot this November, so if you want to know what’s at stake, listen in. Doug Fine’s book is: TOO HIGH TO FAIL: CANNABIS AND THE NEW GREEN ECONOMIC REVOLUTION. 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 11:00am

What is human consciousness and does it emerge from some particular part of our brain? Do other animals experience consciousness and is there any proof for the evolution of consciousness. These are some of the most essential and important questions of our existence. Our guest tonight on Inquiry is DANIEL BOR, a research fellow at the Sackler Center for Consciousness Science and the Department of Informatics at the University of Sussex. His new book THE RAVENOUS BRAIN: HOW THE NEW SCIENCE OF CONSCIOUSNESS EXPLAINS OUR INSATIABLE SEARCH FOR MEANING is a dynamic and fascinating review of the latest scientific discoveries in the neurosciences and what it can tell us about our experience of who we are

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