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Programming Archive

Monday, March 24, 2014 - 6:00pm

Toast of the Brazilian jazz scene Luciana Souza offers up her trademark style of gentle but adventurous vocal explorations. With four Grammy nominations for Best Jazz Vocal under her belt, Souza lights up the Allen Room with a panache reserved for veterans twice her age. Wendell Pierce hosts.

Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 10:30pm

Molly Chester knows a thing or two about  traditional foods. Her new book BACK TO BUTTER  shows readers how to find and cook with traditional foods and cut the processed, chemical-laden products for good. While so many of the foods our parents and grandparents cooked with have gotten a bad rap, Molly, debunks those bad reputations and empowers readers to reintegrate many of those items back into their pantries and cooking. Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 when Al is joined by chef and cookbook author Molly Chester. It just might be good for your health.

Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 10:00pm

In an encore episode of The Business Beat, Steve Jones-D'Agostino, strategic partner of Susan Wagner PR + Best Rate of Climb,, interviews John Giangregorio, president of the Canal District of Worcester and owner of the 22-year-old Three Gs Sports Bar, located in the Canal District. They talk about renewed hope for a decade-old vision for the Blackstone Canal. This episode aired originally on September 1, 2013.

The Blackstone Canal was conceived by businessmen in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island at the beginning of the 19th century, as a way to connect Worcester and the Blackstone Valley towns to the sea at Narragansett Bay. Financed by Yankee entrepreneurs and dug by Irish laborers, it was inaugurated in 1828 with the successful journey of the Lady Carrington upstream to Worcester.

Twenty years later, after ceasing commercial operations, the Blackstone Canal remained open as a waterway, becoming increasingly used as a sewer until it was arched over and forgotten in the 1890s. During the latter portion of the 19th century and first half of the 20th century, the area formerly bisected by the canal became a thriving mixed-use and multi-ethnic neighborhood based on the Eastern European immigration of that period.

By the latter part of the 20th century, the canal area had lapsed into a long decline. The construction of I-290 destroyed a huge swath of housing to the east and largely cut off access from Grafton and Vernon hills. The Jewish population had prospered and moved to the city's West Side. And Union Station, which had once boasted 162 trains per day, had closed and fallen into disrepair.

Throughout the first decade of the 21st century, the area has seen substantial rebirth as an entertainment district, now populated with more than 20 new bars, restaurants and clubs. Enclaves of retail activity are being established as well, and some of the larger buildings are being converted to residential use. Now referred to as the Canal District, the area is a popular night-time and weekend destination and is widely acknowledged to be the city's most actively developing neighborhood.

The introduction of streetscape improvements throughout the Canal District is expected to reinforce the progress of recent years. And the proposed Blackstone Canal project, which seeks either to open and restore or at least replicate the canal from Union Station south to Kelley Square - continues to spark imaginations throughout the city. The district is now served both by the active Canal District Business Association and by a broader affiliation group called the Canal District Alliance.

In recent years, the Canal District has been host to numerous events, including the annual Blackstone Canalfest, which took place last September 7. Last June 2, stART of the Street held a festival in the Canal District, which attracted about 20,000 people.

Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 10:00pm

Inquiry welcomes back EDWARD H. BURTT JR, Cincinnati Conference Professor of Zoology at Ohio Wesleyan University. He is the author, along with William E Davis Jr, of the book ALEXANDER WILSON: THE SCOT WHO FOUNDED AMERICAN ORNITHOLOGY. Tonight Jed talks about the plans for celebration of the 200th year anniversary of the publication of Alexander Wilson’s American Birds, one of the first great scientific volumes written in America. There will be a one-day symposium on all things Wilson on April 23, 2014 at Ohio Wesleyan University. If you would like to attend this once in a life time celebration of Wilson and his art, go to: http://wilson200.owu.edu/ .Also discussed in this interview, Wilson’s legendary meeting with John James Audubon and whether Audubon copied some of Wilson’s artwork. 

Thornton W. Burgess is probably best known for writing some of the best children’s nature literature of the twentieth century. But he hosted a very popular radio program, created a grass roots nature sanctuary effort and even worked with scientists documenting  the last Heath Hen in Massachusetts. Tune in and learn about this talented writer and environmental educator when we talk with writer and teacher CHRISTIE PALMER LOWRANCE and her new book NATURE’S AMBASSADOR: THE LEGACY OF THORNTON W. BURGESS

Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 9:00pm

Tonight Inquiry welcomes writer, physicist and physics professor at M.I.T. MAX TEGMARK who talks about his amazing new book OUR MATHEMATICAL UNIVERSE: MY QUEST FOR THE ULTIMATE NATURE OF REALITY. Is it possible that the ultimate foundations of the universe are mathematical structures? Is time an illusion? Could we be living in a simulation like in the Matrix? All this and more on tonight’s conversation with one of the most original theorists of cosmology.

Inquiry talks with ERROL FULLER, artist, writer and world authority on bird and animal extinction. His new book is titled LOST ANIMALS: EXTINCTION AND THE PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORD and is a collection of amazing and poignant photographs of extinct mammals and birds. Tune in and listen to the stories of the people who took these photographs of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers and Thylacines, the unique marsupial carnivore (pictured here).

Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 4:00pm

Catch Colors of Jazz when host Bonnie Johnson celebrates Women's History Month and the spring membership drive with guests including pianist, composer, educator Hey Rim Jeon, jazz vocalist TAEKO and bandleader, singer/songwriter Michelle Cruz. Tune in at 4pm.

Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 7:00pm

Back by popular demand!

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 6:00pm

Ernesto Antonio "Tito" Puente, was an American salsa musician and Latin jazz composer

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 4:00pm

The Passenger Pigeon once existed in numbers that defy belief. One nesting colony took up 850 square miles. They migrated in flocks that were measured in many miles. These flocks darkened the skies and took hours and even days to pass overhead. A single moving flock near Toronto in 1860 was measured at one to three billion birds. Yet forty years later the Passenger Pigeon was almost extinct and by the early 1900s was never to be seen again. What happened? Tune in to Inquiry tonight when we talk with JOEL GREENBERG, Research Associate of the Field Museum and the Chicago Academy of Sciences Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. His new book lays out all the evidence for the Passenger Pigeon’s sad demise: A FEATHERED RIVER ACROSS THE SKY: THE PASSENGER PIGEON’S FLIGHT TO EXTINCTION. 

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 4:00pm

Do you think it is a simple thing to tell if a work of art is a genuine masterpiece or a forgery? Well think again. Sometimes the process can be very complicated and even bizarre. Tonight on Inquiry we speak with ADAM LERNER, Director and Chief Animator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver about his new book FROM RUSSIA WITH DOUBT: THE QUEST TO AUTHENTICATE 181 WOULD-BE MASTERPIECES OF THE RUSSIAN AVANTE-GARDE. 

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