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Programming Archive

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 - 12:00pm

Ironman is the famous Marvel superhero alter ego of arms dealer and playboy  Tony Stark. Stark built an exoskeleton that amplified his performance and strength. In later movies and comics, the Iron Man suit is directly plugged into Tony Stark’s brain creating a unique melding of man and machine. This sounds fantastic, something possible only in the realm of comics, right? Well, not so fast. Recent technological and medical developments in neuro-prosthetics are creating human brain-machine interfaces that are beginning to approach the fantasy of the Iron Man comics. Tonight on Inquiry, we welcome back E. PAUL ZEHR, Professor of Neuroscience and Kinesiology at the University of Victoria, British Columbia. His new book INVENTING IRON MAN: THE POSSIBILITY OF A HUMAN MACHINE is an overview of some of the startling and mind blowing recent discoveries in human machine engineering and their possible benefits for people with amputations, spinal chord injuries and severe strokes. Zehr’s book is also an examination of what would happen to a real person if they attempted to wear the Iron Man suit. The answers will surprise you. All fans of ole Shell Head be sure to tune in!

Tuesday, November 8, 2011 - 6:00pm

Acclaimed as one of Australia's finest young jazz vocalists, Emma Franz has had twelve years experience fronting bands ranging from intimate trio settings through to big bands such as the popular Moovin' and Groovin' Orchestra. She has worked with many fine Australian musicians in performances at prominent jazz clubs, festivals, five star hotels, casinos and concert venues in Melbourne, Sydney, and around Australia.

For years Emma has been regular featured singer on national television shows such as Tonight Live with Steve Vizard, Hey Hey It's Saturday, The Midday Show, and Good Morning Australia. Her overseas engagements have included esteemed hotels and corporations in Europe and Asia. She is a recording artist and session vocalist, a songwriter for Warner Chappell, and in 1998 was a Finalist in the Australian National Jazz Awards.

Emma's repertoire includes hundreds of songs in the jazz idiom, as well as R&B and funk material. She is noted for a voice and performance individual in character and style.

 

Tuesday, November 8, 2011 - 2:00pm

On Tuesday Drummer & Percussionist  George Lernis make his Jazz New England debut. This Cyprus-born musician attended Berklee and the Longy School of Music and is in the process of establishing his band. They have a new release and an upcoming New England appearance. Hear all about it Tuesday at 2 p.m.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011 - 11:00am

Tonight we welcome back writer, critic and long-time columnist and blogger for Vanity Fair JAMES WOLCOTT who continues his conversation about his book LUCKING OUT: MY LIFE GETTING DOWN AND DIRTY IN SEVENTIES NEW YORK. Tonight, James Wolcott discusses how long it took for him to be considered an established New York critic, the proliferation and mainstreaming of porn during that decade and finally his discovery and deep love of ballet.

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 7:00pm

Join host Tom Shaker as he celebrates the life and music of a very unique soul singer. Singer Minnie Riperton was well on her way to becoming a pop and soul legend when she died of breast cancer in 1979, at age 31. Riperton was blessed with an astounding five-and-a-half-octave vocal range, and achieved her greatest commercial success with the hit ballad, "Lovin' You."

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 6:00pm

Harp virtuoso Edmar Castaneda draws from jazz, Afro-Cuban and Colombian joropo traditions to weave enchantment on the Rose Hall Stage. Famed Brazilian percussionist Airto Morera, who can make music on almost anything, leads our jazz Carnivale -- with Toninho Horta (guitar), Mark Egan (bass) and Kenny Werner (piano). Wendell Pierce hosts.

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 2:00pm

It's a guitar celebration on Monday's Jazz New England when John Stowell and Joe Weinberg join us. Portland, Oregon based John Stowell is described by virtuoso Larry Coryell as " master creator with incredible originality." Joe Weinberg has performed and taught in New England for years and works regularly with John Stowell on his trips east. Join us Monday at 2 pm for some serious "picking."

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 11:00am

Why is a mouse on the floor a pest, but a mouse in a cute cage a pet? Why is it fine to feed white rats to boa constrictors, but people would shudder and scream if anyone tried to feed kittens to a snake? The way we think about animals defies logic. It’s emotionally complicated and differs dramatically depending on culture. Tonight’s guest is HAL HERZOG, one the world’s leading anthrozoologists, a scientist who studies how humans think about animals. His new book is titled SOME WE LOVE. SOME WE HATE. SOME WE EAT. WHY IT’S SO HARD TO THINK STRAIGHT ABOUT ANIMALS. Tonight we talk about if there are differences between “dog people” and “cat people”; if children who abuse animals grow up to be violent adults; what happens when vegans backslide, and why everyone seems to hate snakes. The answers will surprise you. 

Sunday, November 6, 2011 - 10:30pm

Many consider Americas decisive defeat of the Japanese at "Midway" during WWII as one of great luck and providence. However, my guest this week argues that it was nothing short of superior intelligence and tactics. Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 when I will be speaking with Craig Symmonds, professor Emeritus at the United States Naval Academy as we recount this historic moment and once and for all set the record straight.

Sunday, November 6, 2011 - 9:00pm

Researcher and writer ELLEN PRAGER has written what amounts to a “tell all” of life in the oceans. This features unusual creatures with very bizarre sex lives and lots and lots of slime. Prager has also included some amazing notes on why these creatures, strange and weird as they are, are important to humanity. Tune into tonight and learn how hagfish can tie themselves into knots; why a giant sea slug is critical to research on the human brain and why you should never, EVER eat the lobster’s tomalley. Prager’s vastly entertaining  account of marine life is titled SEX, DRUGS AND SEASLIME: THE OCEAN’S ODDEST CREATURES AND WHY THEY MATTER.

Every bird’s nest is a wonderful example of non-human architecture. Imagine trying to weave and intricate tight cup of moss, lichen and spider’s webs using only your mouth and sometimes your feet! Yet birds do this every breeding season. Tonight on Inquiry, we welcome PETER GOODFELLOW, retired English teacher and lifelong birder, who has written one of the most beautiful books on the nests that birds create and how they build them: AVIAN ARCHITECTURE: HOW BIRDS DESIGN, ENGINEER AND BUILD. From simple scrapes in the ground, to monumental platforms high in trees, from enormous mounds of sand to mind-boggling complex hanging woven baskets, birds create structures of stunning complexity and variety. If you have ever marveled at the nest of a robin or oriole, be sure to tune in.
 

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