You are here

what's happening at WICN...

Support for wicn.org comes from...

Programming Archive

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 - 12:00pm

Guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli is known for playing the great guitar compositions of the 1930's on his seven-string guitar. He played with Benny Goodman and for many years was a member of Doc Severinson's Tonight Show Band. In honor of Father's Day, Bucky Pizzarelli joins his son and fellow guitarist John Pizzarelli for this special episode of Piano Jazz. The duo play together on "Tangerine" and "In A Mellow Tone."

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 - 11:00am

Frederick Law Olmsted “may be the most important American historical figure that the average person knows the least about.” He designed Central Park; Boston’s Emerald Necklace; the grounds of the United States Capitol Building as well as numerous parks, universities and hospitals that we all enjoy to this day. He created the idea of landscape architecture and perfected the art of creating natural and beautiful public spaces.  He was an environmentalist who looked at Boston’s Back Bay fens as a wetlands restoration project. Olmsted was also a noted journalist, author, a scientific farmer and even went to sea and had adventures worthy of Two Years Before The Mast. Inquiry’s guest tonight is journalist and author JUSTIN MARTIN here to talk about his new dynamic biography: GENIUS OF PLACE: THE LIFE OF FEDERICK LAW OLMSTED. Tune in and learn about what it took to create Central Park. 

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 - 11:00am

When Hollywood directors like Spielberg, De Palma and Zemeckis want to make sure their science fiction films look real, they often call in science consultants to get their suggestions. But how much influence these scientists have on the final look of the picture varies tremendously from film to film. Certainly any good director wants the science of their film to be correct, but not when it gets in the way of a good story or adds to the budget. So there is often a struggle between the science consultant’s knowledge and the director’s vision. Tonight on Inquiry, we speak with DAVID A. KIRBY, Senior Lecturer in Science Communication Studies at the Centre the History of Science, Technology and Medicine at the University of Manchester. His new book LAB COATS IN HOLLYWOOD: SCIENCE, SCIENTISTS AND CINEMA looks at this complex and often rocky relationship between the scientists on call and the rest of the film crew. If you are a fan of science fiction films, don’t miss this interview!

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 6:00pm

Judy turns the tables on Marian (Marian interviewed Judy years ago) and talks with Marian about her adventures during WWII playing for the troops and meeting Jimmy McPartland during this period and how it all influenced her music and career.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 2:30pm

Her real name was Kathleen Annie Pannonica Rothschild de Koenigswarter, but she was better know to the jazz musicians and artists of New York City as the legendary Nica, the “jazz baroness”. This amazing woman abandoned a life of the rich and famous, to become a friend and patron to jazz musicians like Charlie Parker, Thelonius Monk and Art Blakey. Tune in tonight, when Inquiry welcomes music historian and educator DAVID KASTIN who talks about his amazing new history and biography NICA’S DREAM: THE LIFE AND LEGEND OF THE JAZZ BARONESS. 

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 2:00pm

Inquiry welcomes back award-winning children’s book author and illustrator LYNNE CHERRY. Tonight Lynne talks about the series of films she is making of young students from across the United States and the world, who have decided to do something on their own about global climate change. Whether it is to create a greener, more fuel-efficient school, starting a school garden to grow their own produce or doing citizen science to measure river flows, these teens are helping create a better future for the planet. To see some of Lynne’s films, go to:
http://youngvoicesonclimatechange.com/
 

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 2:00pm

Researcher and writer ELLEN PRAGER has written what amounts to a “tell all” of life in the oceans. This features unusual creatures with very bizarre sex lives and lots and lots of slime. Prager has also included some amazing notes on why these creatures, strange and weird as they are, are important to humanity. Tune into tonight and learn how hagfish can tie themselves into knots; why a giant sea slug is critical to research on the human brain and why you should never, EVER eat the lobster’s tomalley. Prager’s vastly entertaining  account of marine life is titled SEX, DRUGS AND SEASLIME: THE OCEAN’S ODDEST CREATURES AND WHY THEY MATTER.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 2:00pm

Joan Mitchell was one of the most original and passionate artists of the last half of the Twentieth Century. She painted her large abstract canvases with the precision of a fencer creating paintings that were “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.”Mitchell may have called herself a “lady painter”, but she was a blunt, bawdy and bullying presence who mixed it up with the likes of Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning and Phillip Guston. Our guest tonight is writer and curator PATRICIA ALBERS who has written one of the most complete, incisive and entertaining biographies of this great artist: JOAN MITCHELL: LADY PAINTER. A LIFE. 

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 2:00pm

What can a Magritte painting tell us about scientific theories? Why is the Little Prince like the essentials of quantum physics? These unusual questions will be answered tonight by GIOVANNI VIGNALE, the Curator’s Professor of Physics at the University of Missouri. His new book, THE BEAUTIFUL INVISIBLE: CREATIVITY, IMAGINATION AND THEORETICAL PHYSICS uses metaphors and analogies from literature and art to discuss some of the most abstract ideas of physics. Tune in and find out why theoretical physics is the modern form of theology.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 1:30pm

Science Fairs are no longer about exploding Plaster of Paris volcanoes or mouse traps and ping-pong balls to demonstrate nuclear fission. Today’s high schoolers are now solving problems that have puzzled scientists for years and the stakes involves prize money of many thousands of dollars and an assured future career in science. For many of these current science fair participants, winning means being able to go to the college of their choice. Writer JUDY DUTTON followed twelve contestants in the prestigious Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, and tells their amazing stories in her new book SCIENCE FAIR SEASON: TWELVE KIDS, A ROBOT NAMED SCORCH AND WHAT IT TAKES TO WIN. Tune in and learn about what these new Einsteins and Gates are up to. 

Pages

Of Interest

Know Your Host:
Jim Benitez

A self-taught Latin percussionist since the age of 12 when his father handed him Cal Tjader’s 1960 “Latino” album featuring Mongo Santamaria and Willie Bobo back in 1966, and an LP fiberglass conga and told him, “Here, learn to play right with these”, he’s been living and breathing Latin Jazz since.

Tune in to Latin Jazz Now!
Fridays, 7 to 11 pm

Join

Become a Member now!

YOU are the public in public radio. Everything we do is only possible with your support.

CLICK HERE  to contribute now or call us toll free at 855-752-0700.

Don’t forget to select your Thank You gift from our current selection!

Thank you for your support!

Sponsor

Underwriter of the Week

   
Westboro Toyota is a family owned business located on Rt. 9 in Westboro for almost 40 years.

271 Turnpike Rd
Westborough,  MA  01581
888-336-4725

www.westborotoyota.com