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Programming Archive

Sunday, September 30, 2012 - 10:00pm

On this week's Business Beat, Steve D'Agostino is joined by Worcester Attorney Marcia Tannenbaum who discusses effective approaches in divorce mediation and other family disputes, including two non-adversarial approaches that enable to you resolve legal conflicts through negotiation, without litigating.

Friday, September 28, 2012 - 6:00pm

To inaugurate the 2011-12 jazz season at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., director of jazz Kevin Struthers wanted something special and different. So he called on go-to alto sax man Steve Wilson, and Wilson delivered an all-star jazz group — Bruce Barth (piano), Michael Bowie (bass), Lewis Nash (drums) — plus three violins (Diane Monroe, Matvei Sigalov and Naira Underwood), a violist (Dawn Michelle Johnson), a cellist (Troy Kenneth Stuart) and high expectations.

Wilson has long been one of the busiest players in jazz. And yet he says that playing with a string section is one of the most exhilarating experiences he's had on the bandstand. For him, the strings have an emotional sound that is close to the human voice, and he shapes his solos to fit that sound. Wilson's personal favorite of the Charlie Parker With Strings songbook is our closing song, "Repetition," by Neil Hefti. Be sure to catch the performance at 6pm this Friday on this week's Jazz Set.

Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 7:00pm

50 years ago to the day, on September 27, 1962, the New York Times ran a story entitled "Bob Dylan: A Distinctive Folk Song Stylist" after his first Carnegie Hall concert. So most of the evening will feature Dylan songs performed by him, but also a by a number of other artists.One of those songs -- "When the Ship Comes In" -- will help host Nick Noble segue briefly into a handful of sea songs, as the Portsmouth Maritime Folk Festival (where WICN has been a presence for three years now) runs 9/28-9/30.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 6:00pm

Jason Moran is one of the most talked-about pianists and composers of the past decade. In 2010, he was made a MacArthur Fellow and is now the top jazz adviser for the Kennedy Center, picking up where Dr. Billy Taylor left off. Moran opens this session with a song from his latest album, Ten, called "Blue Blocks" — a commission by the Philadelphia Museum of Art for an exhibition of quilts from Gee's Bend, Ala. The way Moran describes the quilts to host Jon Weber sounds very much like Moran's own music.

"It's quite fascinating, because there are quilts that one might say are similar to something that Piet Mondrian might paint. It's very architectural," Moran says. "But what they use — old clothes, or even old quilts or old swatches of fabrics, and then weave them together and the lines just come out a bit askew."

Moran epitomizes a modern approach to music, regularly employing sampled loops as a "fourth band member" in live performances. Here, Moran performs a broad and exciting set of 21st-century jazz piano tunes.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 6:00pm

Australian classical pianist Simon Tedeschi talks about his jazz piano pursuits, his particular love of stride piano and performing the music for the movie “Shine” at the tender age of 14. Tune in at 6pm to hear more about Tedeschi's riveting musical endeavors.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 11:00am

IN 1835, the capital of the United States was known as Washington City. The President at that time was Andrew Jackson, who was pro-slavery. But at least 4000 inhabitants of the city were former slaves called “free men”. Racial tensions and relations in the Washington City reflected the conflicted feelings of the country as a whole. There were many white people who still believed in slavery of course; but others who thought we should end slavery but send the Black Americans back to Africa. True Abolitionists were gaining ground, but their ideas and literature were considered subversive in Washington. The Red and Blue dynamics we see in the political landscape today was started at this time. Key players included Francis Scott Key, who penned The Star Spangles Banner, but who had a later political career in which he became a champion of slavery. Tune in tonight when we talk about this complicated story of race, politics and little known American history with reporter, correspondent and writer JEFFERSON MORLEY. Morley’s new must-read history is titled SNOW-STORM IN AUGUST: WASHINGTON CITY, FRANCIS SCOTT KEY AND THE FORGOTTEN RACE RIOT OF 1835. 

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 10:00am

Tonight on Inquiry we welcome writer, editor and chef TAMAR ADLER. Her new ground breaking book AN EVERLASTING MEAL: COOKING WITH ECONOMY AND GRACE is definitely not a cookbook, though there are many recipes in it. Instead, her book follows in the tradition of past writers like M.F.K. Fisher in describing a refreshing different attitude about food and cooking that is “both simpler and more necessary than we imagine.” Tune in and learn about Adler’s evolving notions about cooking and hear her read a selection from her book. This is a book about food that you can read cover to cover and actually learn something important. 

Monday, September 24, 2012 - 6:00pm

From the stage of Dizzy's Club Coca Cola, we hear three keepers of the jazz flame - each with his own ensemble. Pianist Cyrus Chestnut, guitarist Russell Malone and bassist Christian McBride form an all-star rhythm roll call. Wendell Pierce hosts.

Sunday, September 23, 2012 - 10:30pm

The Harvey Ball is held every year by Worcester Historical Museum and is a celebration of all the good things about Worcester.  It takes its name from Harvey Ball, the inventor of the Smiley Face, and each year WHM honors one individual, organization or group that has made a positive impact in the City of Worcester. Tune in this Sunday evening when Al is joined by William Wallace Executive Director of the Worcester Historical Museum as they discuss this annual gals. And don't forget to smile.

Sunday, September 23, 2012 - 10:00pm

In an encore episode of The Business Beat, Join Steve D'Agostino interviews Craig Van Batenburg of the Auto Career Development Center. They talk about the present and future state of hybrid vehicles. 

Craig started the Auto Career Development Center in 1998 while he was running his Worcester auto-repair shop, which was across the street. ACDC held Massachusetts State Emission classes there as well as many other technical and management courses. Craig taught there and hired many other local trainers to teach there, and ACDC grew quickly.

In 2004, Craig closed the ACDC training-center building as hybrid technology had found its place. He was off and running around the globe, enlightening those who needed a hybrid education. Today, Craig uses three local shops, Bravo Motors, D.J. Automotive and Wayside Automotive, for classes near home. Ninety-five percent of ACDC training is held out of state.

The offices are located at 40 Boyd St. in Worcester, upstairs in his old New England, inner-city home. The place is easy to spot -- look for lots of hybrids in the driveway! Ten houses away is, another old New England home owned by Craig, which houses more office space and room for all the hybrids, parts and associated training materials.

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