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Programming Archive

Sunday, December 4, 2011 - 9:00pm

Tonight, Inquiry welcomes JONATHAN STUHLMAN, Curator of American Art at the Mint Museum and STEPHEN  ROBESON MILLER, curator and art historian to talk about the fascinating exhibition DOUBLE SOLITAIRE: THE SURREAL WORLDS OF KAY SAGE AND YVES TANGUY at the DAVIS MUSEUM AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE till January 15, 2012. For more information on the museum and exhibition, go to: https://www.davismuseum.wellesley.edu

There is a real passion for the writing of Jane Austen today. There are also the many movies and television series of Jane Austen novels, Jane Austen paper dolls, action figures and numerous Jane Austen “spin off” novels, one that even combines Pride and Prejudice and zombies. It is a veritable Jane-o-mania! But what is it about her novels, written long ago in Regency England that appeals to audiences today? Tonight’s guest on Inquiry is RACHEL M. BROWNSTEIN, Professor of English at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate Center. Her new witty and insightful book, WHY JANE AUSTEN?,  answers what is uniquely special about Jane Austen’s writing and why she is such an easy author to fall in love with.
 

Friday, December 2, 2011 - 6:00pm

Hear the Columbia University based quartet of Mathisen on saxophone, Chris Washburne on trombone, brother Per Mathisen on bass, Tony Moreno on drums, with Ole's exploratory, layered New Jazz Work entitled "Mirage. "We don't want the music to sound complicated," he says, "We only want it to BE complicated. If it sounds complicated, then it's difficult for people to relate to it. It needs to sound funky and earthy and visceral and emotional, and then also intellectual..."

Thursday, December 1, 2011 - 6:00pm

Join us on Thursday December 1st at 6pm for a special program airing on the life and music of the famous one-armed Louisiana trumpeter, Wingy Manone. Aside from his notable compositions (such as Tar Paper Stomp, Stop the war, the Cats are Killin' Themselves, No Calling Card, and Fare Thee Well, to name a few) he is also remembered for playing the trumpet so flawlessly with his prosthetic arm, that most crowds never knew of his disability. Tune in at the same time, next week for Part II!

 

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 6:00pm

Pianist Herbie Hancock is an innovator whose ideas continue to push boundaries and transcend musical genres. His work has earned him 14 Grammy Awards, including Best Pop Vocal Collaboration for the 2011 album Imagine. Hancock solos on his own tune, "Dolphin Dance, and joins McPartland for a duet take on "That Old Black Magic.

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 11:30am

Tonight on Inquiry we have a lively conversation with artist LISA BARTHELSON. Though she started out painting, her latest works involve using a crazy variety of  found objects and encaustic to create series of complex assemblages. Lisa also creates works on  a very large scale-using materials like duct tubing, play balls and Mylar emergency blankets to fashion large room sized environments. Tune in tonight for a fascinating talk with this dynamic New England artist. To see examples of her work and read her artists’ statement, go to:
http://www.lisabarthelson.com/
 

Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 6:00pm

Drummer Dave Tull has provided rhythm for everyone from Chuck Magione and Michael Buble, to Jack Sheldon and Family Guy creator Seth McFarlane. While Dave has also occasionally sung a tune or two with these groups and others, he’s recently focused on performing his own beautiful melodies and often hilarious lyrics. Dave is a favorite among jazz musicians, who relish his spot on laments of the sometimes ridiculous challenges jazz musicians face.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 11:30am

In the early and mid nineteenth century, the economies of both Louisiana and Cuba depended on the growing of sugar cane. In both areas, this industry was made possible by similar brutal systems of slavery. But after the American Civil War and after the prolonged war for Cuban independence, the political and social fates of the freed black slaves were incredibly different. How did Cuba develop a  more racially and culturally diverse culture and why  Louisiana’s state government systematically work to disenfranchise the freed black citizens from their voting rights?   Tune in tonight for a fascinating history of race and politics when we speak with REBECCA J. SCOTT, the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of law at the University of Michigan.  Her important and dynamic new book is DEGREES OF FREEDOM: LOUISIANA AND CUBA AFTER SLAVERY. 

Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 11:00am

The International High School at Prospect Heights in Brooklyn is a school where students from forty five different countries, speaking twenty-eight different languages come together to learn English and become part of American society. By the time the students arrive at school, many have survived trauma and hardship that is hard for many of us to imagine. Though at times school life is chaotic and confusing, thanks to a very dedicated staff of teachers and administrators, this school often succeeds in teaching many students English.  Despite language, social and political differences that at first seem insurmountable, students also learn  how to integrate themselves into the wider global society . Tonight’s guest is writer BROOKE HAUSER, who spent years observing the daily life of the students at International High School and has written a wonderful, yet grittily realistic book about her observations: THE NEW KIDS: BIG DREAMS AND BRAVE JOURNEYS AT A HIGH SCHOOL FOR IMMIGRANT TEENS. 

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 7:00pm

The man who built Hitsville, USA turns 82 this week! Berry Gordy, Jr. will always be remembered for the hundreds of chart toppers to come out of his Motown records. Join host Tom Shaker to celebrate Berry Gordy’s musical legacy. It all stars at 7pm.

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 6:00pm

From its start in 1952, The Modern Jazz Quartet had a cool, understated style that belied its complexity. Pianist John Lewis, vibraphonist Milt Jackson, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Kenny Clarke combined classical music structures with the deep swing of jazz. The MJQ made vital music for over 40 years. Our quartet -- drummer Lewis Nash, pianist Kenny Barron, bassist Peter Washington and vibraphonist Steve Nelson - honors those late modern masters. Wendell Pierce hosts.

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