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Programming Archive

Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 10:30pm

Author and historian Walter Stahr spent time in Worcester doing research at the American Atiquarian Society for his new book, Seward (Lincoln's Indispensible Man).William Henry Seward was not only Lincolns Secretary of State and adviser he was also a trusted friend. Tune in this Sunday evening when Al speaks with Walter Stahr about his long awaited biography of Seward. Have contemporary Secretaries of State worked as close and been as dutiful as Seward? Find out how this ultimate statesman has become a mainstay in American history.

Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 10:00pm

In an encore episode, Steve D'Agostino interviews Craig Blais of the Worcester Business Development Corp. They talk about leveraging Worcester's abundant assets to create significant amounts of new wealth and jobs.

On April 2, Craig Blais, who had been executive vice president of the WBDC, began serving as president and CEO of the WBDC. He replaced David Forsberg, who had retired after serving in the positions since 1999. Craig is responsible for overseeing the $10-million, non-profit corporation.

Craig’s career began in 1986 at the State House, as chief of staff for the House of Representatives. He reported to the chairman of the Joint Committee on Human Services & Elderly Affairs. He also served as district staff coordinator in charge of constituent services.

In 1992, Craig became the assistant town manager in Arlington, where his responsibilities included the preparation of a $60-million municipal budget. He also oversaw the management of a 23-town solid-waste-disposal operation, implemented a total-quality-management program, and served as the town's representative on the MBTA and MWRA advisory boards.

Craig was elected to three consecutive terms as a member of the Auburn Board of Selectmen, serving as the chair from 1994 to 1996. During his time on the Board, he advocated and won the approval of a $50-million regional-mall expansion, the acquisition of more than 100 acres of open space, the development of a 20-acre industrial park, and implemented an innovative fire-service staffing program with Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

Craig also served in various economic-development positions with the City of Worcester, including director of Economic Development. In all of these roles, he oversaw a $1-billion economic-development agenda that included the construction of a $250-million health-care facility, a new convention-center construction project, and various major infrastructure-enhancement projects throughout the city.

Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 9:00pm

Tonight on Inquiry we welcome back Adam Zahler, Associate Professor of Theatre at Worcester State University and also the Chair of Visual and Performing Arts Department. Adam talks about the new production of Tony Kushner’s masterpiece Angels in America: The Millineum Approaches. Performances at Worcester State University will be November 15, 16, and 17 at 8PM and November 18 at 2PM.  For information about tickets and times, please go to:
https://wordpress.worcester.edu/tickets-now-on-sale-for-fall-production-of-angels-in-america-the-millennium-approaches/

Could medical cannabis be the next big cash crop for America? What is the real cost of America’s on-going drug war? Tune in tonight when we talk with writer and reporter Doug Fine who spent a year with the hard-working cannabis farmers of Mendocino County, California where under strict control people are legally growing marijuana for medicinal use despite constant harassment by the Federal government. This question about the decriminalization of marijuana is on the Massachusetts State ballot this November, so if you want to know what’s at stake, listen in. Doug Fine’s book is: Too High to Fail: Cannabis and the New Green Economic Revolution.

Saturday, November 3, 2012 - 4:00pm

Founded and led by Russian-born musical director and guitarist Slava Tolstoy, the International String Trio has collectively and individually performed throughout New England and the world. Tolstoy is joined by upright bassist Ippei Ichimaru, who was born in Japan, raised in Australia and Cheltenham, England native violinist Ben Powell.  All three gentlemen received their music education at Berklee College of Music. The trio brings style and a global flair to a repertoire that incorporates classical, jazz, popular and culturally diverse music including Italian, French, Russian, Jewish, Spanish, Latin American, Gypsy and Irish.

http://www.internationalstringtrio.com/

The International String Trio will celebrate the release of their latest CD - Movie Night - on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 at Scullers Jazz Club in Boston. Catch Colors of Jazz when host Bonnie Johnson debuts music from the CD and speaks with members of the group. Be sure to tune in at 4pm this Saturday!

Friday, November 2, 2012 - 6:00pm

Tune in this Friday at 6PM to catch back to back performances of the Lewis Nash Quartet and Kurt Elling from the performances at the Newport Jazz Festival from this summer. Nash is an accomplished jazz drummer who has collaborated with many artists, such as Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Stitt, and Oscar Peterson to name a few. Elling is a jazz vocalist, composer, and lyricist who has bee nominated for nine Grammy Awards since 1995 and continues to release award winning albums. 

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 7:00pm

A 4-hour tribute to one of the great folk groups of all time. In 1959, Glenn Yarborough, Alex Hassilev, and Lou Gottlieb burst on to the folk music scene as the Limeliters. Their complex sound and sophisticated stage show made them an ovenight sensation. TIME magazine said that  "If the button down scrubbed looking Kingston Trio are the undergraduates of big-time folk sing-ing, The Limeliters are the faculty." Over the ensuing decades, the Limeliters went through a variety of lineup changes, but they still go on today. Join host Nick Noble for a four hour journey through the career and musical outpourings of the Limeliters: from the suggestive nuances of "Vicky Dougan", "Le Jour de Luth" and "Have Some Madeira, M'Dear" through the double-Grammy nominated album for kids-- Through Children's Eyes-- and on into the 21st century, the Limeliters represent all that is best and most memorable from the folk revival period and its legacy. Tune in and enjoy!

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 11:00am

The special guests on tonight’s Inquiry are LEXI LEE SULLIVAN, Assistant Curator at the Decordova Sculpture Park and Museum and RACHAEL ARAUZ independent curator. They are here to talk about two new exciting and thought provoking exhibitions at the Decordova: two collaborative installations by JEAN SHIN and BRIAN RIPEL, CASTLES IN THE AIR and MEASURING THE DEPTHS OF HIS OWN NATURE and a retrospective exhibition of the work of JULIANNE SWARTZ titled HOW DEEP IS YOUR. Tune in and learn about these interesting artists and their work. For more details about these exhibitions, go to: http://www.decordova.org/ 

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 10:00am

Massachusetts historian and natural historian JOHN GALLUZZO decided that for the year 2011 he would take a 30 minute hike in a green space in every town and city in the state. It was a mammoth task to undertake and plan. John had to deal with poor weather, swarms of insects and family crises, but in the end he accomplished his goal. Tune in tonight and listen to John talk about what the real goal of this amazing project was; what some of his favorite places in the state were and what he learned along the way. His book, which is also a nice guide to walking and hiking spots across the state is HALF AND HOUR A DAY ACROSS MASSACHUSETTS. 

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - 7:00pm

Join Nick DiBiasio on Halloween night, Wednesday October 31 from 7 to 11pm, for the annual Against The Grain Halloween Special, featuring spooky music and eerie sounds, including murder ballads and songs about demons, witches, vampires, werewolves, spiders, ghosts, gravediggers, and psychos by Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Richard Thompson, Warren Zevon, The Band, Marty Robbins, The Grateful Dead, and many more!

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - 1:30pm

Neil Sedaka is synonymous with popular music. For more than 50 years, he's written, performed and produced the soundtrack for America's collective psyche. Sedaka had a string of early-1960s pop hits, and his songs have been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Connie Francis, Elvis Presley and The Monkees, among others. Sedaka is truly a balladeer at heart.

"I think there are three kinds of songs, it's only my theory: psychological, emotional and spiritual," Sedaka says. "When you write psychologically or intellectually, you have a tune in your mind and you re-write it. It's an intellectual approach. The emotional is my favorite because it comes from my kishkas; it comes from my soul. It's a catharsis, you get it out, you cry it out, you let it go. The spiritual writing of the song is where you're chosen as a vehicle and it comes from something up above. You don't move; it writes itself. It's very spooky, but that's happened to me just a few times."

On this episode of Song Travels, host Michael Feinstein and his guest talk and play iconic pop and great standards, including one of his many hits: "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do."

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