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Programming Archive

Monday, March 10, 2014 - 4:00pm

Host Chet Williamson chats with saxophonist Tim Hegarty.

Sunday, March 9, 2014 - 10:30pm

For years nicotine has been the number one culprit in tobacco and tobacco related illness. Now a new studie reveals that this notorious stimulant may enhance learning and help treat Parkinson's, schizophrenia and other neurological diseases. Is this possible? Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 when Al speaks with Discover magazines Dan Hurley who has followed this story and now reveals the findings.

Sunday, March 9, 2014 - 10:00pm

In an encore interview, Steven Jones-D'Agostino, strategic partner of Susan Wagner PR + Best Rate of Climb, interviews District 4 Worcester City Councilor Sarai Rivera. They talk  about the role of community development corporations in inner-city housing development. This episode aired originally on August 11, 2013.

More than a century ago, Main South was a summertime respite for many of Worcester's rich and elite. This was before the advent of the auto, when Main South was relatively rural and remote compared with the downtown area.

In recent decades, developers such as Russell Haims of Main South-based Hampton Properties–whose motto is “Peace, Love & Shelter”–have done marvelous restorations of many of these historical and architectural treasures. And, Clark University has closely worked with City Hall, the Main South Community Development Corporation and many others, to make the neighborhood more safe, secure and attractive.

While Main South has come a long way in recent decades, it's still got a long way to go. Steve's guest, Sarai Rivera, talks about that continuing journey. Her district includes Main South. She is also a clinical therapist and co-senior pastor, along with her husband, Jose Encarnacion, of Christian Community Church.

Sunday, March 9, 2014 - 9:00pm

Tonight on Inquiry we welcome journalist, teacher, screenwriter and story editor BEVERLY GRAY. She talks about the latest edition of her wonderful biography ROGER CORMAN: BLOOD-SUCKING VAMPIRES, FLESH-EATING COCKROACHES AND DRILLER KILLERS. Roger Corman specialized in making films that elevated the exploitation genre, films like Little Shop of Horrors and The Trip. He made them fast and he made them cheaply. Beverly Gray worked for Roger Corman in a number of different jobs and has written an incredible insiders look at this legendary director and producer who in turn worked with luminaries like Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard, John Sayles, Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda. Tonight is part one of our conversation and we concentrate on Corman’s year working for American International Pictures.

Ann Dvorak was a hardworking charismatic star of film beginning in the 1920s. Her career at Warner Brothers was set to take off and the press hailed her as “Hollywood’s new Cinderella.” Then it all began to unravel. Dvorak was a complex and fascinating person who accomplished a lot, but she bravely bucked the Hollywood system and remains largely unknown today. Tune in to Inquiry tonight and find out why when we talk with writer and librarian CHRISTINA RICE about her new biography ANN DVORAK: HOLLYWOOD’S FORGOTTEN REBEL.

Saturday, March 8, 2014 - 4:00pm

Celebrate Women's History Month when pianist, composer and Guggenheim fellow Myra Melford talks with host Bonnie Johnson. Melford's 2013 solo piano CD, Life Carries Me This Way (Firehouse 12 Records), has a simple cover yet comprises a colorful selection of "compositions inspired by the artwork of her friend, the late Sacramento-based artist Don Reich (1931-2010)". Among her many pursuits, Melford unites several musicians with ongoing projects that include live and recorded sessions with bassist Mark Dresser,  drummer Matt Wilson, clarinetists Ben Goldberg and Marty Ehrlich among others;  Mentors have included Ran Blake and Worcester native Jaki Byard.  Currently Associate Professor, Improvisation and Jazz at UC Berkley, the arts advocate begins a sabbatical this spring with a stop at Lilypad, Cambridge on March 14th.  Catch Colors of Jazz to hear more about Ms. Melford's musical journey into "collaborative creativity". Tune in at 4pm.

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - 7:00pm

...and more! With special guest Cameron Sutphin.

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - 10:30am

Elizabeth “Betsy” Patterson Bonaparte was a Baltimore legend, one of America’s first international celebrities. A remarkable beauty, she married the charming and spoiled Jérôme Bonaparte of France when she was only seventeen but was quickly abandoned by him thanks to the wishes of Napoleon and the French Government. From that moment on, Betsy lived an incredible  life, a self-made woman who would have nothing to do with petty romance again. She traveled back and forth  to Europe, dismissing her many would be suitors along the way. But that is only part of Betsy’s amazing story. Tune in tonight to Inquiry when we speak with historian and writer CAROL BERKIN. She is currently the Baruch Presidential Professor of History. Her latest biography is titled WONDROUS BEAUTY: THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ELIZABETH PATTERSON BONAPARTE

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 6:00pm

Flutist Dave Valentin, who has recorded over 15 albums, combines together the influence of pop, R&B, and Brazilian music with Latin jazz to create a slick and accessible form of crossover jazz.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 3:30pm

Tonight on Inquiry we talk about some of the most unique creatures in the oceans when we speak with STEPHEN R. PALUMBI, Professor of Biology and Director of the Hopkins Marine Station at Stanford University. His new book, written with his son writer and journalist Anthony R. Palumbi is titled THE EXTREME LIFE OF THE SEA. This book is a run down of some of the life found in the deepest, most shallow, coldest and warmest parts of the world’s oceans. This is natural history at it’s best. Tune in and learn about worms that turn snails into zombies, fish that skip over the land and a species of coral (pictured) that has been growing since before the pyramids were built. 

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 2:30pm

Tonight on Inquiry we talk with writer and activist LEAH VINCENT about her harrowing memoir CUT ME LOOSE: SIN AND SALVATION AFTER MY ULTRA-ORTHODOX CHILDHOOD. This is a gripping and heart-wrenching account of Leah’s long process of breaking away from her very strict and conservative religious background and becoming her own person. 

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Know Your Host:
Al Dean

Al grew up listening to the music of the 40’s on his father’s EH Scott radio and 78 records. Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald and Benny Goodman were family favorites. This is first experience in the broadcasting field and allows him to dig into his closet of old vinyls and share them with his audience on the Sunday afternoon edition of the Jazz Matinee.

Tune in to Jazz Matinee
Sundays, 12 to 4 pm

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