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Programming Highlights

Thursday, October 2, 2014 - 6:00pm

An accomplished pianist from a very early age, Matt Savage returns for another visit here at DreamFarm Radio. Joining Matt are fellow Berklee graduates Hoo Kim (bass) and Nahum Corona (drums). Topics of discussion: the relations between Wayne Shorter's Footprints and Chick Corea's Fingerprints.

Thursday, October 2, 2014 - 7:00pm

Four hours of folk songs by some of the great female artists of the folk revival and beyond, featuring the likes of Odetta, Judy Collins, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Carolyn Hester, Barbara Dane, Jean Ritchie, Dar Williams, and more!

Sunday, October 5, 2014 - 9:00pm

Tonight Inquiry has a lively conversation with Kelli Russell Agodon, prize-winning port, writer and editor. She talks about her amazing new published collection Hourglass Museum as well as the many other projects she is involved in. She also does a reading from a work in Hourglass Museum.

The elementary particle the neutrino may hold the key to some of the deep mysteries of the universe like why the universe contains matter at all. But the neutrino is unlike any other matter particle (matter particle). Neutrinos are electrically neutral, have very little mass and may be its own anti-particle! And that’s just the beginning. Tune in tonight when Inquiry welcomes Heinrich Päs, professor of Theoretical Particle Physics at the Technische Universität in Dortmund, Germany. His new book, The Perfect Wave: with Neutrinos at the Boundary of Space and Time is a wonderful summary of all the exciting research that has shown that the neutrino may be the key to understanding the structure space and time.

Sunday, October 5, 2014 - 10:00pm

In an encore of The Business Beat, Steve Jones-D'Agostino, strategic Partner of Susan Wagner PR + Best Rate of Climb,  interviews Jeffrey Chin, CEO, Daniel Mastrototaro, vice chair of the Board of Directors, and Rebecca Joseph, co-chair the Alumni & Friends Association of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Massachusetts/Metrowest. This episode aired originally on May 4, 2014.

Big Brothers Big Sisters maintains that it is "as old as friendship and as new as today." The Worcester-and-Framingham-based organization was founded in 1963 as Big Brothers of Worcester County. Initially, it serves seven needy boys by matching them in supportive mentoring relationships with community volunteers.

The demand for Big Sisters made it clear that the time had come to extend services to girls, and a Big Sisters chapter was added to the agency in 1974. The president of the Board of Directors told a local reporter at the time, “To turn our heads from the needs of young girls, would not permit us to fulfill our responsibility as a social service agency.” The name of the organization changed to reflect the newest program addition: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Worcester County.

By the late 1990s, more than 2,500 matches had been made over the history of the organization. In 2002, the organization agreed to manage Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Middlesex and, in 2004, the Board of Directors of both agencies voted to merge. In 2005, the organization name was changed to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Mass/Metrowest.

Sunday, October 5, 2014 - 10:30pm

Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers—mainly young women—suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 when Al speaks with Salem State University professor and author Emerson Baker about his new book, A Storm of Witchcraft. Hear how this period in Bay State history still haunts us to this day.

Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 7:00pm

A FEW OF MY FAVORITE SONGS – a once-a-year indulgence by host Nick Noble. Older and wiser, he shares many of his favorite tracks, for a fun four hours.

Sunday, October 12, 2014 - 9:00pm

Inquiry welcomes LINDA PRZYBYSZEWSKI, Associate Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Her new book is THE LOST ART OF DRESS: THE WOMEN WHO ONCE MADE AMERICA STYLISH. For much of the Twentieth Century a group of woman called “The Dress Doctors” , followed the lead of the Arts and Crafts Movement and through classes and books, taught women dressmaking, clothes budgeting and the fundamentals of style: harmony, rhythm, balance, proportion, and emphasis. They encouraged women to dress for success in the workplace and aimed to turn women into creators not shoppers. Tune in and learn about this little known, but fascinating history of fashion in America and why women’s hats need to make a comeback.

Tonight on Inquiry we talk with author and illustrator ANNETTE CATE LEBLANC about her entertaining and  informative new book for young readers: LOOK UP! BIRDWATCHING IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD. Tune in and find out how Annette got interested in birds and how she crams so much onto every page. This is one of the best books in a long time that teaches young people how to observe and draw the natural world around them!

Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 7:00pm

THE WEAVERS, THE KINGSTON TRIO, AND PETER-PAUL-&-MARY. An evening of recordings by the three most successful folk groups of the Folk Revival period (1950-1970).

Sunday, October 19, 2014 - 9:00pm

Artist, writer and curator MATT FREEDMAN decided to write and draw four pages in his journal every day he underwent extremely complicated and painful chemo and radiation therapy for cancers in his mouth and tongue. This journal was photo-reproduced in the book RELATIVELY INDOLENT BUT RELENTLESS: A CANCER TREATMENT JOURNAL. This is a powerful and very funny look into Matt’s mind and body as he suffered the tortures of the damned just trying to get well.

Tonight on Inquiry we talk with writer and journalist SAM KEAN about his fascinating history THE TAKE OF THE DUELING NEUROSURGEONS: THE HISTORY OF THE HUMAN BRAIN AS REVEALED BY TRUE STORIES OF TRAUMA, MADNESS, AND RECOVERY. In tonight’s show we talk about Phineas Gage (pictured) , the man who had a long tamping bar pass throw the middle of his brain and lived to tell about it. We also learn about the frightening Capgras Delusion in which a person believes his loved ones have been replaced by duplicates. In each of these cases, something important is revealed about how our brains are structured and how they function.  Tune in and find out if free will is really an illusion.

Sunday, October 26, 2014 - 9:00pm

When Dr. JOEL GOLD started practicing medicine at Bellvue Hospital, he came across several patients suffering from he calls The Truman Show Delusion: believing that everyone around you is watching you and recording your life. What do delusions like this tell us about how the brain functions and how are delusions related to society? In a society where social media is everywhere and the government is indeed watching and listening in on your life, how can we tell who is having delusions and who is sane? What do we know about how anti-psychotic drugs work? Dr. Gold is currently a Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine. His new book, written with IAN GOLD, PhD, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Psychiatry and McGill University is titled: SUSPICIOUS MINDS: HOW CULTURE SHAPES MADNESS. THE TRUMAN SHOW DELUSION AND OTHER STRANGE BELIEFS.

Several hundred unidentified bodies are found in the United States every year.  About a half have died of natural causes or of self-inflicted deaths. The rest have been murdered. Though local forensic labs and police departments work long and hard to put a name and identification to these bodies, many remain cold cases. In recent years, a dedicated group of amateurs armed only with computers and a knack for remembering details and faces have aided authorities by matching missing person reports with these unidentified bodies. Tonight on Inquiry we learn all about these amateur sleuths and how they work when we talk with journalist and science writer DEBORAH HALBER about her wild new book THE SKELETON CREW: HOW AMATEUR SLEUTHS ARE SOLVING AMAERICA’S COLDEST CASES.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 9:00pm

Insects are all around us in a myriad of forms. Some people fear insects. Others hate them. But many of the people of the world eat them. And why not?  Insects are tasty, nutritious and a great source of fat and protein. Furthermore, raising insects for consumption is much more environmentally friendly than raising any other meat. Tonight on Inquiry we talk with MARCEL DICKE, Professor of Entomology at Wageningen University and a Rhodes Professor at Cornell University. He has co-written a book the beautifully promotes entomophagy: the eating of insects titled THE INSECT COOKBOOK: FOOD FOR A SUSTAINABLE PLANET. Tune in for some tips on the best ways to cook a locust.

Tonight on Inquiry we welcome artist JESSICA GATH. Her works include beautiful paintings, self-portraits and wonderful performance pieces that often involve the audience. Tune in and learn about the smallest cake in the world, the legendary French-Off and The World-Famous Secretary.

Of Interest

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